Paying for fame – Washington Post On Success Response

Q: How much privacy do super-successful public figures deserve? Do the infidelities of Tiger Woods or former presidential candidate John Edwards change your perceptions of them?

Response from motivational speaker Garrison Wynn

Human beings do the same things regardless of their individual level of fame or talent. We just expect more of people who are well-known because we secretly want them to pay a price for their fame and money. For the general public, it’s a combination of envy and an understandable inability to emotionally put ourselves in their shoes.

 

Super-success is usually a package deal: You win fame and attention, and the bonus prize is life under a microscope — which just so happens to magnify the good and the bad. So, whether a public figure seeks fame or gets thrust into the spotlight because of some off-the-charts giftedness, the price of that fame is already high. But most of us won’t understand that unless we actually become famous, which means you will more than likely never know (no offense).

Our research shows that a high percentage of people who are willing to do what it takes to become extraordinarily good at something suffer from compulsive behavior. (It’s the foundation of drive.)

Consider: All Elvis Presley wanted in the end was to be able to go to the movies without having to rent the entire theater. He once said it would be nice to be in an audience, not just be there for the audience. That might make a very compulsive person feel he needs a special someone on the side — or maybe it just drives him to eat a lot of peanut-butter-and-banana sandwiches!

Read more “On Success” Questions and Responses from the Washington Post

One Response to Paying for fame – Washington Post On Success Response

  1. marcelpierre says:

    well ,i a ma completetly in agree with you,thanks you for teaching what is success.God bless you.

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